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Category: Health & Well-Being

The Art of Keeping Cool

This content is created as part of my collaboration with Verlocal as a Verlocal ambassador. Visit Verlocal.com to find more ways to enhance your life through cool adventures and unique experiences in your city!

Nervous Texting

There comes a time, or more likely many times, when one is faced with circumstances that try his or her patience, nerves, or confidence. If you’re like me (i.e., a chronic over-thinker with a lot of emotions and/or character flaws, depending on who is talking), these events occur on a rather regular basis.

Throughout my childhood, I was a bully’s dream. I reacted to anything and everything, and vehemently. My intense reactions to stressors were nothing less than self-destructive. As a college student, I realized the error of my ways.

*FLASHBACK*

When I was in middle school, my local public library had a used book sale every afternoon. (Actually, they probably still do, but that is irrelevant because this story is set in circa-2004) Quite often, I would stop by on a regular basis and impulse buy as many $1 to $2 books as I had money for.

One such book was called The Art of Keeping Cool.

No, it wasn’t a self-help book. It was some little-known fiction novel. And I actually never read it so this piece is not about what I learned from this book. What it is about is this: The Art of Keeping Cool.

From my 20-some years of experience being part-firecracker, part-Energizer bunny, the most valuable lesson I have learned is The Art of Keeping Cool. I only became a novice in this art in the last, say, 18 months.

(Photo: David Mckee/Shutterstock)

But this skill, and lots of yoga, has been correlated to an immense increase in my own personal happiness and in that of my amazingly tolerant family and friends, who no longer have to spend hours reassuring me that so-and-so was completely out of line or that X is probably not mad at me because I said I was going to that social gathering and then I didn’t go.

I call it, Practicing Perspective (patent pending).

“What the…” you say, as you wonder why you’re taking advice from a neurotic twenty-something.

But, seriously, it works.

Practicing perspective means when you start getting riled up — frustrated, annoyed, angry, embarrassed, disappointed, worried, guilty, etc., etc., etc. — you stop and think:

“Will I care about this in a week? Month? Year?”

keep coolIf the answer is “no” to any of those questions then whatever it is is just not worth stressing over. Practicing perspective means keeping your eye on the big picture and adjusting where your emotional priorities lie accordingly.

It’s a simple method that works wonders. I imagine an incredible amount of hours a day would be more productively spent all over the world if everyone would follow this method.

So just to recap:

In the event of a stressful situation…

1.) Take a deep breath

2.) Think “Will this matter in…”

          a) One week?

          b) One month?

          c) One year?

If no, exhale, and move on.

Don’t spend any further time worrying your pretty (or handsome) little head on it.
Your time can be better spent on worrying about all the things you answered “yes” to for options a, b or c!

Now get off this blog and go enjoy your life!

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What I Love This Week: Tespo

Not to succumb to America’s consumer culture, but every so often I make a rather significant purchase that brings a little light into my life (similar to the effect of good food,  but to a lesser extent). I’m still building my list of “What To Not Skimp On” — food, running shoes, bed sheets — and health and fitness are some of the highest items on the list.

As someone who is not the *most* eager exerciser or the quickest to reach for an apple over a cupcake, I believe any investment that encourages me to take care of myself is worthwhile.

I went pescatarian about six years ago in an effort to improve my health. It worked really well for me and had a hugely positive effect on my cholesterol levels. However, at the time I was a competitive swimmer and noticed a distinct drop in energy levels. To help with this, I was told to take a daily multi-vitamin to keep my iron levels nice and perky. Okay, easy enough.

Except it wasn’t. I was constantly forgetting to take my vitamins and, as a result, often felt sluggish (I also was constantly turned away from blood drives due to low hemoglobin…). So when I came across was targeted by an advertisement for Tespo via Instagram, I was immediately enticed. Tespo is a fancy contraption that blends your vitamins for you in liquid form, removing fillers (which are the things that often make people’s tummies hurt) and making the vitamins more readily available for the body. After a few back and forths over whether it was worth it or not, I decided it was and bought a machine & monthly vitamin pack (they have women’s, men’s, children’s, energy, focus, and sleep) for about $120 with a discount I found online. It came in the mail on Thursday, and I ooed and awed and then set it up. The next morning, I inserted the vitamin cartridge, plugged it in, and clicked the on button. It then whirled the little shot glass around before coming to a stop. It was filled about a forth of the way, if that, with orange liquid with visible particles. I looked at it skeptically and called out to PIF, who was in another room, “well, about to take my vitamin shot…” “Tell me how it is!” he yelled back, as if genuinely interested. I definitely prepared myself for the worst. I imagined the chalky taste of crushed up Women’s One-A-Day’s in water. Then I thought, “I paid over 100 bucks for this thing. I better choke it down.” I took a deep breath and I knocked it back.

“It’s GOOD!” I yelled to PIF, but mostly for my own benefit. In fact, it WAS good. It was slightly sweet and citrus-y, but not particularly strong in any particularly flavor, and almost a bit like watered down Tang. I filled the little cup with a bit more water, swirled, and took the next sip to make sure I got all the nutrition outta there.

Cut to today (day 3 of taking Tespo vitamins). I have way more energy than I usually do and fewer cravings. Obviously, Tespo will have to pass the test of time, but I’m okay with that. Honestly, even if it’s a placebo that makes me feel better but has zero pharmacological effect, I’ll be okay with that. The Tespo vitamin system definitely takes up counter space, cost a pretty penny, and requires more scientific evidence, but the potential for improved compliance, increased energy, and daily happiness my new toy gives me offset the costs for me.

And hey, it is better for my health than $120 worth of Magnolia Bakery banana pudding (hint, hint: foreshadowing)…




To get your own Tespo, visit Amazon or www.tespo.com. And don’t forget to also purchase your monthly delivery of vitamins as well!

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on perspective

This post was originally featured on my blog What the Health Now? before being transferred over to Three Times Per Day.

 

There comes a time, or more likely many times, when one is faced with circumstances that try his or her patience or anger management abilities. If you’re like me (i.e. you have a lot of emotions and/or character flaws, depending on who is talking), these events occur on a rather regular basis.

Throughout my childhood, I was a bully’s wet dream. I reacted to anything and everything, and vehemently. My intense reactions to stressors were nothing less than self-destructive. As a college student, I realized the error of my ways.

*FLASHBACK*

When I was in middle school, my local public library had a used book sale every afternoon. (Actually, they probably still do but that is irrelevant because this story is set in circa 2004) Quite often, I would stop by on a regular basis and impulse buy as many $1 to $2 books as I had money for.

One such book was called The Art of Keeping Cool.

No, it wasn’t a self-help book. It was some little-known fiction novel. And I actually never read it so this piece is not going to be on what I learned from this book. What it is going to be about is this: The Art of Keeping Cool.

From my 20 years of experience being part firecracker, part Energizer bunny, the most valuable lesson I have learned is The Art of Keeping Cool. I only became a novice in this art in the last, say, 6 months. But this skill, and some medication (kidding), have been correlated to an immense increase in my own personal happiness and in that of my amazingly tolerant friends, who no longer have to spend hours reassuring me that so-and-so was completely out of line or that X is probably not mad at me because I said I was going to that social gathering and then I didn’t go.

I call it, practicing perspective (patent pending).

“Da fuq,” you say, as you wonder why you’re taking advice from a neurotic twenty year old’s amateur blog.

But, seriously, it works.

Practicing perspective means when you start getting riled up–frustrated, annoyed, angry, embarrassed, disappointed, guilty, etc., etc., etc., you stop and think “Will I care about this in a week? Month? Year?”

If the answer is “no” to any of those time periods than it’s just not worth stressing over. Practicing perspective means keeping your eye on the big picture and adjusting where your emotional priorities lie accordingly.

It’s a simple method that works wonders. I imagine cardiologists and therapists all over the world would see a massive decrease in business if everyone would follow this method.

So just to recap:

In the event of a stressful situation…

1.) Take a deep breath

2.) Think “Will this matter in…”

          a) 1 week

          b) 1 month

          c) 1 year

If no–exhale–and move on. Don’t spend any further time worrying your pretty (or handsome) little head on it. You time can be better spent on worrying about all the things you answered “yes” to for a) b) or c). 

Now get off this blog and go enjoy your life!

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